History, Medway, Railways, Train, Trains, Trainspot, UK

Medway Stations 2 – Gillingham

Continuing the potted series on my local stations, the next one on the ‘up’ line from Rainham is Gillingham.

The station was originally opened as ‘New Brompton’ in January 1858, the main station building being situated on the ‘Down’ platform, being similar in structure to the one at Rainham.  This was demolished in 1973 and replaced by prefabricated buildings, housing staff accommodation.

A goods yard was provided on the ‘down’ side, to the east of the station. This had two eastward-facing sidings, one which ended behind the ‘Down’ platform. The second passed through a 45ft long goods shed.  In 1877, after an act of parliament the previous year, a branch line to the north was provided to gain access to Chatham Dockyard.  This passed through a cutting and over a bridge, terminating at the Dockyard.  It was around this time that a substantial goods shed with 3 lines was placed adjacent to the ‘up’ line to the east of the station.

In 1912, the name changed to “Gillingham”, and a year later the first of many re-models started.  Firstly the addition of a third set of rails next to the “up” platform, creating the now familiar island configuration of the ‘up’ platform.  Below is shown the “A” signal box, next to the up platform.  This remained in operation until the early 1970’s.

Gillingham_A_Box_1972

The Gillingham “B” signal box is below, next to the level crossing.  Also at this time the footbridge from which this photo was taken was built.  The spur to Chatham Dockyard can be seen on the right.

Gillingham_2004_4

An extension to the electric section of railway, from the already electrified section as far as Swanley, was agreed in 1935.  This would bring third rail operations as far as Gillingham, and the works were completed in 1939.  As previously talked about in the Rainham section, it would be almost 25 years until the rest of the south and south-eastern network would be electrified.  An EMU (Electric Multiple Unit) depot to the east of the level crossing was established, and EMU stabling commenced shortly after, something it continues to do today.

The 2nd station building, situated on the bridge over the railway is seen below.  It remained like this until a major reconstruction in 2011, when a new glass façade was built.

Gillingham_2006_2

1200px-New_Gillingham_Station_Front

In the early 1990s, a scheme centered around the “Networker” program meant a new building was built to the west of the level crossing signal box on the ‘Up’ side.  This building was meant to contain a new signalling centre, however after its completion in 1994, the building remained empty, only to house a railtrack archive centre.  Eventually though, due to the start of the ‘East Kent Re-Signalling Scheme’ in 2012, the building was fitted out with equipment.  It is now the main signalling hub for the North Kent area, with only a few signal boxes on the fringes of the area operational (including Folkestone and Minster).  It is known as the ‘North Kent Operations Centre’.

Pictures used here are not my own, but are from the following site, and owned by David Glasspool : (except the new Gillingham Station façade, (c) Wikipedia

Kent Rail – Gillingham

Videos of the rail network can be seen on my YouTube Channel

Many thanks for reading and stopping by, I’ll blog again soon.

History, Medway, Network Southeast, Railway, Rainham, Southeastern, Train, Trainspot

Medway Stations 1 – Rainham

A small potted history of the Railway stations in my home area, Medway, Kent.  I will start with my “Home” Station, Rainham.

The station was opened on 25th January 1858, as “Rainham & Newington”.  It formed part of the London to Dover route of the “East Kent Railway”.  The Station comprised of two platforms and two sidings adjacent to the “up” line platform (for those new to railway terminology, the “up” line is towards London, and the “down” away from London).  The station was re-named “Rainham” in1862 when Newington station was built to the east.  A further 400 yard siding was introduced beside the “down” platform in 1897, and a signal box was also added at this time, enabling the removal of the manual point system.

Ownership by the Southern Railway commenced in 1923.  This was to bring a few cosmetic changes to the station furniture, as well as a footbridge next to the level crossing to the east.

The next major change would not come about until 1957. The “Kent Electrification Scheme” was initiated in the area throughout what was now known as the “Chatham Main Line”. This comprised on a 750V third rail system, with line speeds up to 75mph initially, although this was raised to 90mph around 1962.rainham%20Station%201958.jpgThe advent of British Rail meant changes for Rainham, many not very good.  The major change was the demolition of the original station building, which was replaced by a one story prefab :

rainham-station1980

New automated level crossing gates were  installed in December 1972.  At sometime in the early 1980’s the remaining siding was removed from behind the “down” platform.

When “Network South East” took over in 1986, the station was revamped in the familiar red and white chevrons, and in 1990 a new station building was opened.  This one was a modern brick structure with a glazed arched roof, and was a vast improvement on the 1970’s prefab :

rainhamStation2006

As part of the 2014-2017 “East Kent Re-Signalling Project”, it was decided that Rainham would have a bay platform added adjacent to platform one on the “up” side.  This involved lengthening platform one considerably to accommodate 12 car trains in this new bay, which was given a designation of “Platform 0”.  New pointwork to the west of the station was installed to service the platform, and new SPAD (Signal Passed At Danger) signal was placed at the eastern end of platform 1.  The new platform arrangements are seen below, facing to the west with the new platform 0 to the left of the picture :

Rainham_Bay_Platform_1

The future of Rainham Station is bright.  Since 2009, “Javelin” 395 units have stopped here, giving access to high speed services to St Pancras International.  In 2018/19, a Thameslink service is scheduled to start from the bay platform to Luton via Abbey Wood and St Pancras.  This will enable passengers to access the new Crossrail “Elizabeth Line” via Abbey Wood.

Pictures used in this piece are not my own, but can be found (as well as many others of the Station) in the following locations :

Rainham History – Rainham Station through the years

Rainham History – Rainham Station

A video I have taken of  37 800 travelling through Rainham Station can be found on my YouTube channel, just click the link below :

37 800 passes through Rainham Station

Thanks for reading, I’ll blog again soon.

Freight, Freightliner, Railway, Railways, Train, Trains, Trainspot, Trimley

Trimley (St Mary) – a hidden gem

Whilst looking for a place to spot Freight coming up from Felixstowe in 2014, I decided that the station in the village of Trimley St Mary would offer some great views of traffic coming up from the docks.  On visiting this small Station for the first time, I loved the location, however was perplexed at how the station building was in such a state of dis-repair.  It was then I decided to find out more, and stumbled upon a community effort to re-instate the building as a community hub.

Delving deeper into the history of the station, I learnt that the duel platform station did indeed have a working ticket office up to 1967, and had a working signal box up until 1988. Signal control is now carried out from Colchester.  The view east towards Felixstowe is shown below, where a class 66 is hauling an intermodal service, and a Abellio Greater Anglia service is leaving towards Felixstowe.  A further picture shows another intermodal service heading towards Felixstowe from the Footbridge overlooking the level crossing.

What I have not photographed (rather surprisingly) is the station building, which is a fantastic example of a “new Essex Style” building, and according to the Trimley station website is “one of only two to be built outside of Essex”.  It was conceived by the architect WN Ashbee, who also designed the station at Felixstowe.

Only Platform one can be accessed now.  The level crossing is monitored by CCTV and is fully automatic.  The footbridge really only acts as a short cut should the barriers be down, but does offer great views both east and west along the line, particularly west, where you can get great photos of the freight approaching the station.

Many walks can be found around the station, one especially which follows the line down to the Port of Felixstowe, very pleasant on a nice day.  A pub (the Mariners Freehouse) is a 15 minute walk away, and serves a very nice lunch (go up station road, turn left and keep on going!), as well as a newsagent at the same location which provides the usual snacks. A link to the Pub website is here :

The Mariners Freehouse Trimley

I highly recommend this location, as you can jump on a train to Ipswich the same day and view the Freightliner depot, as well as sample the delights of this small village and its station.

Please visit the Trimley Station Community Trust website to know more, they can be found at :

Trimley Station Community Website

Videos of my time at Trimley can be found on my YouTube channel, Click the link below.  Thanks for reading, I’ll blog again soon.

Rainham Rail Enthusiast Featuring Mistydale Model Railway