Top Ten Least Used Railway Stations in Suffolk | 6 – Oulton Broad South

Opened in 1859 by the East Suffolk Railway, it was originally named Carlton Colville.  The line like most in Suffolk was amalgamated with the Great Eastern Railway shortly after.  The station wasn’t renamed to Oulton Broad South until 1927

Just to the east of the station under the road bridge, the line split to the Kirkley branch, with services to sites on Lake Lothing.

These included sidings into Kirkley goods depot.  Companies using these would include Boulton and Pauls canning products, and confectionery from Mortons and the co-op group.  This line was fully closed in 1972, and no real trace of it remains.

A station building remains on the working platform, the line here being single running at this point since the late 1980’s.  However the other platform remains with a building which is used for small businesses.  The small goods yard which was adjacent to that platform is now a car park, but its history contains the fact that pullman camping coaches were positioned here between 1952 and the late 1960’s

This view from the road bridge shows clearly that the line used to be double tracked at this point.

Passenger services at time of writing are provided by class 755 bi mode units.

As far as facilities go, the station has an electronic ticketing machine, help points and posters not only for the regional rail network, but also information about the area. There is also this old style ‘direction of travel’ board, which is great to see.

The passenger entry and exit figures for 2019/2020 were 43, 518

Oulton broad south is a quiet station, but is still used fairly frequently.  The fact that both platforms remain is great, and the station buildings, although not being used for their original purpose, are still in situ.  For the enthusiast, although sight lines are good, the absence of freight means that traffic is very light indeed.

My 2021 Vlog from the station can be viewed below.

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rainhamrailenthusiast

I am a railway enthusiast based in Rainham, Kent. I enjoy mainly modern traction, however the history of rail, especially in places I visit, also interests me. I also have a static model railway, Mistydale, which has its own Facebook page. Thanks for visiting.

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