UK Railway News (w/e 12/07/2020)

Some news from the UK railway industry this week, some articles may frequire a free subscription.

An agreement has finally Been signed to allow direct trains from London to Amsterdam. In the past, coming back from Amsterdam meant catching a local Thalys service to Brussels, dis-embarking through border checks and then joining the Eurostar. These checks will now be done at Amsterdam, enabling passengers to bard the Eurostar directly. However the new services will not come into effect until later in 2020. Read more here : Agreements signed to allow direct Amsterdam – London trains

Blackpool’s trams will begin operating again on July 19th 2020. Due to Covid-19, the services had been suspended since 29th March 2020. The services will be every 20 minutes with social distancing measures in place. More can be read here : Blackpool trams to resume as UK light rail operators reflect government guidance

Snowdon mountain railway has taken delivery of two hybrid locomotives. The engines are highly efficient, with regenerated braking being used to charge the batteries on the downhill run. The railway is also expected to open on July 10th 2020, with the relevant social distancing measures in place. More here : Two hybrid locomotives unveiled as Snowdon Mountain Railway reopens

Not much else of note this week. As always, many thanks for reading and i’ll blog again next week.

If you enjoyed this, please search for Rainham Rail Enthusiast on YouTube, Facebook, Instagram and Rail Siding, thankyou

YouTube channel :

Didcot Railway Centre

In September 2018, I visitied the Didcot Railway Centre, located adjacent to Didcot Parkway Railway Station.  Access is via the railway station, just tell the barrier personnel if you are visiting the centre and they will let you through.  A wristband will be provided by the museum enabling you to get out.  However if you arrive by train, you can just walk down the stairs from the platform, turn right and the entrance is at the end of the passageway.

IMG_20180911_131053611

There is a very reasonably priced entrance fee (£6.50 per adult on a non running day, rising to £11 – £15 on running days (September 2018)), which has a family ticket option as well as the usual reductions for senior citizens. One thing of note that on non running days, admission is paid inside the museum.

didcot railway centre

The walk down to the first set of buildings takes you past an old coal stage, an impressive sight at track level.  Then you arrive at a collection of buildings, comprising a shop, cafe and a G Gauge model railway.  Next to the cafe is a museum, this contains many GWR artifacts, and although it seems small, quite a lot is packed in here.  Here are a few photos on some of the items on display.  Note that this is just a fraction of what is here, it is quite an impressive collection.

Next to here is the new signalling centre exhibit.  Its main attraction is the Swindon Panel, and was still being worked on when I visited.  It was still fascinating to see the exhibits in here, and nice to see preservation of a different kind for a change, not just with locomovtives and rolling stock.

Moving further up towards the Carriage display, views of the mainline to Oxford can be seen on the right.  There is also a running track which is used on running days, with two stations at either end.  A picnic area and play park is also here.  The carriage display is very comprehensive, and includes a Traverser.

P1020812

Various wagons and a signal box are at this location too, all very well cared for.  Further up still is a section which has some broad gauge engines, an unusual sight.

I decided to end my day at the engine shed, which is opposide the cafe.  I good array of Great Western steam locomotives are found in here, and I would imagine would be a great sight on a running day.  A quick trip into the shop and then I left.

 

Overall I was very impressed and will try to get back here on a running day.  I spent a good 2 and a half hours here, which included a very nice lunch in the cafe!  I highly recommend a visit, especially if you are an enthusiast who plans to stay a while at the main station, which I did (more on that in a later blog).

I have made a short video of the centre, uploaded to my YouTube channel, which you can view below :


 

Please visit Rainham Rail Enthusiast on YouTube

Please visit Rainham Rail Enthusiast on Facebook

Please visit MIstydale Model Railway on Facebook


Thats all for now, thanks for reading, I’ll Blog again very soon.

Class 33 – ‘ Crompton ‘ – The Southern Diesel

As far as freight operations go in the South of England, there was only really one workhorse during the 1960’s 70’s and 80’s – the Class 33 “Crompton”.  The nickname came from the electrical equipment manufacturer used in the loco – “Crompton Parkinson”.  Very similar in looks to the class 26, the only difference being the inclusion of a 2 digit headcode indicator between the cab windows.

Originally for sole use in the South East of the region, Kent and Sussex, they rapidly became used throughout the southern region.  They were even used as passenger locos, most memorably on the Weymouth Harbour line.

These passenger services to Weymouth would be in a “push pull” configuration, starting at Bournemouth going down to Weymouth through the streets to the harbour.

The Class 33 has a top speed of 85 Mph, and frequently would work in pairs as “Double Headers” to facilitate longer freight trains.  In Kent, its speciality was primarily hauling freight, although it occasionally rescued failed passenger units.  Because of this, a few were stationed at some locations in the region.  Indeed, when the siding was still at Rainham (Kent), a ’33 could be seen stabled there during the 1970’s.  The loco’s would also provide freight runs further afield, notably cement trains from Cliffe in North Kent, up to Lanarkshire.

In this photo, taken by RMWeb member “eastwestdivide”, two 33’s are seen approaching Strood from the south with a Rake of empty stone carriers from ARC at Allington :

post-6971-0-00774900-1415733865

 (c) eastwestdivide – link Here

These locomotives, along with the British Rail 411 Unit (4 Cep) and variants “Slam Door” were the first trains I saw as a youngster, and the sight of a Class 33 would be extra special.  The noise and smell of these locomotives would fuel my passion for the railway, and as such I have a great fondness for them. They were superseded by the Class 66 in the late 1990’s.

Currently a few remain at Heritage centres around England, and three are owned by the West Coast Railway Company , who provide railtours in the UK.


Please visit Rainham Rail Enthusiast on YouTube.

Please visit Rainham Rail Enthusiast on Instagram.

Please visit Mistydale Model Railway on Facebook.


That’s all for now, thanks for reading and I’ll blog again soon.