History, Medway, Network Southeast, Railway, Rainham, Southeastern, Train, Trainspot

Medway Stations 1 – Rainham

A small potted history of the Railway stations in my home area, Medway, Kent.  I will start with my “Home” Station, Rainham.

The station was opened on 25th January 1858, as “Rainham & Newington”.  It formed part of the London to Dover route of the “East Kent Railway”.  The Station comprised of two platforms and two sidings adjacent to the “up” line platform (for those new to railway terminology, the “up” line is towards London, and the “down” away from London).  The station was re-named “Rainham” in1862 when Newington station was built to the east.  A further 400 yard siding was introduced beside the “down” platform in 1897, and a signal box was also added at this time, enabling the removal of the manual point system.

Ownership by the Southern Railway commenced in 1923.  This was to bring a few cosmetic changes to the station furniture, as well as a footbridge next to the level crossing to the east.

The next major change would not come about until 1957. The “Kent Electrification Scheme” was initiated in the area throughout what was now known as the “Chatham Main Line”. This comprised on a 750V third rail system, with line speeds up to 75mph initially, although this was raised to 90mph around 1962.rainham%20Station%201958.jpgThe advent of British Rail meant changes for Rainham, many not very good.  The major change was the demolition of the original station building, which was replaced by a one story prefab :

rainham-station1980

New automated level crossing gates were  installed in December 1972.  At sometime in the early 1980’s the remaining siding was removed from behind the “down” platform.

When “Network South East” took over in 1986, the station was revamped in the familiar red and white chevrons, and in 1990 a new station building was opened.  This one was a modern brick structure with a glazed arched roof, and was a vast improvement on the 1970’s prefab :

rainhamStation2006

As part of the 2014-2017 “East Kent Re-Signalling Project”, it was decided that Rainham would have a bay platform added adjacent to platform one on the “up” side.  This involved lengthening platform one considerably to accommodate 12 car trains in this new bay, which was given a designation of “Platform 0”.  New pointwork to the west of the station was installed to service the platform, and new SPAD (Signal Passed At Danger) signal was placed at the eastern end of platform 1.  The new platform arrangements are seen below, facing to the west with the new platform 0 to the left of the picture :

Rainham_Bay_Platform_1

The future of Rainham Station is bright.  Since 2009, “Javelin” 395 units have stopped here, giving access to high speed services to St Pancras International.  In 2018/19, a Thameslink service is scheduled to start from the bay platform to Luton via Abbey Wood and St Pancras.  This will enable passengers to access the new Crossrail “Elizabeth Line” via Abbey Wood.

Pictures used in this piece are not my own, but can be found (as well as many others of the Station) in the following locations :

Rainham History – Rainham Station through the years

Rainham History – Rainham Station

A video I have taken of  37 800 travelling through Rainham Station can be found on my YouTube channel, just click the link below :

37 800 passes through Rainham Station

Thanks for reading, I’ll blog again soon.

Freight, Freightliner, Railway, Railways, Train, Trains, Trainspot, Trimley

Trimley (St Mary) – a hidden gem

Whilst looking for a place to spot Freight coming up from Felixstowe in 2014, I decided that the station in the village of Trimley St Mary would offer some great views of traffic coming up from the docks.  On visiting this small Station for the first time, I loved the location, however was perplexed at how the station building was in such a state of dis-repair.  It was then I decided to find out more, and stumbled upon a community effort to re-instate the building as a community hub.

Delving deeper into the history of the station, I learnt that the duel platform station did indeed have a working ticket office up to 1967, and had a working signal box up until 1988. Signal control is now carried out from Colchester.  The view east towards Felixstowe is shown below, where a class 66 is hauling an intermodal service, and a Abellio Greater Anglia service is leaving towards Felixstowe.  A further picture shows another intermodal service heading towards Felixstowe from the Footbridge overlooking the level crossing.

What I have not photographed (rather surprisingly) is the station building, which is a fantastic example of a “new Essex Style” building, and according to the Trimley station website is “one of only two to be built outside of Essex”.  It was conceived by the architect WN Ashbee, who also designed the station at Felixstowe.

Only Platform one can be accessed now.  The level crossing is monitored by CCTV and is fully automatic.  The footbridge really only acts as a short cut should the barriers be down, but does offer great views both east and west along the line, particularly west, where you can get great photos of the freight approaching the station.

Many walks can be found around the station, one especially which follows the line down to the Port of Felixstowe, very pleasant on a nice day.  A pub (the Mariners Freehouse) is a 15 minute walk away, and serves a very nice lunch (go up station road, turn left and keep on going!), as well as a newsagent at the same location which provides the usual snacks. A link to the Pub website is here :

The Mariners Freehouse Trimley

I highly recommend this location, as you can jump on a train to Ipswich the same day and view the Freightliner depot, as well as sample the delights of this small village and its station.

Please visit the Trimley Station Community Trust website to know more, they can be found at :

Trimley Station Community Website

Videos of my time at Trimley can be found on my YouTube channel, Click the link below.  Thanks for reading, I’ll blog again soon.

Rainham Rail Enthusiast Featuring Mistydale Model Railway

High Speed, History, HS1, Railway, Railways, Southeastern, Train, Trains

High Speed 1 – Phase 2 10th anniversary

The 2nd phase of the HS1 line was completed 10 years ago today (14th November), so here is a small history of this section, which I personally benefit from.

The 1st phase of HS1 was completed on 28th September 2003, and connected the Channel Tunnel to Fawkham Junction, located just past Gravesend.  This junction acted as a way to get Eurostar trains on and off the existing rail network, and these trains would then terminate at Waterloo.  However planning had always been in place for a further section of high speed rail which would terminate at St Pancras.  The award of the Olympic games to London hastened the need for the completion of this further section.

Connecting with the existing High Speed line, a new station, Ebbsfleet International was constructed.  This was in preference to a new station adjacent to the M2 between Chatham and Rochester, which was thrown out on environmental grounds.  Further up the line, via two tunnels, a new station at Stratford was built.  This would serve the Olympic park.  Also it would serve as a connection between the high speed line and an extensive national rail and underground service at the existing Stratford Station, which is a 10 minute walk away.

The line then goes through another tunnel, eventually terminating at one of 3 new platforms at St Pancras International – next to the platforms for Eurostar services.  Although these are adjacent, you are not able to gain access to Eurostar from these platforms.

This second section of line was opened on 14th November 2007, and marked the completion of HS1.  However only Eurostar services used the line to begin with, but plans were in place to enable the residents of Kent to benefit from the new line.  A fleet of high speed trains were built by Hitachi in Japan.

The design of these was based on Hitachi’s 400 series “Mini-Shinkansen” and “A-Train”, and were given the designation of a class 395 unit in the United Kingdom.  However the more common “Javelin” name is used for the units, which was given to them because of their affinity with the London Olympics.  The trains were built in japan and shipped to Southampton for final fitting.  In all there are currently 29, 6 car sets currently running on the Southeastern / CTRL HS1 network.

The trains are 6 car, with 340 seats per train.  A quick coupling system allows running of two sets at once, and this was used for almost all of the shuttle trains between Ebbsfleet International and Stratford International during the Olympics.  This configuration is also expected to be used more widely in the future, as all domestic stations on the route have been changed to accommodate 12 car trains.  This includes the new station at Rochester, and the new platforms at both Rainham and Strood.

The new “Javelin” began full service on December 13th 2009, and although initial take-up was slow, it is now a very busy service, both on the Ashford and Kent coast Via Medway routes.  A “Roundabout” service which officially runs as “St Pancras Intl to St Pancras Intl” runs from London, through Medway to Ramsgate and Folkestone, then up through Ashford and up to London.  To Avoid confusion, the route is however split up into sections on route boards at stations.

The Journey times between Kent at London have been cut by up to 45 minutes between Ashford and London, and the convenience of connections to the north of the country at Kings cross and St Pancras has made the line very popular.  Trains from the Kent coast via Faversham and Strood connect to the line at Fawkham Junction, where the trains move from third rail to pantograph operation.

Stratford International station has been criticised for being something of a white elephant, as only the Southeastern services stop there.  Plans have been talked about for some while to bring the German ICE trains to use the route, which would stop at Stratford International.  There is however no agreement still on when, or even if, these services will start (although in March 2017, Deutsche Bahn announced they would like it to start in 2020).  The station is still well used however, and the regeneration of the Olympic Park and Westfield shopping centre enable it to still be a viable station on the network.

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Videos of mine relating to Railways, can be found on my YouTube channel, just search “Rainham Rail Enthusiast” in YouTube.  Thanks for reading, I’ll blog again soon.

 

Freight, Railway, Railways, Trains

Ipswich and its Freightliner Depot

One of my most favourite places to visit in the past few years has been Ipswich.  The Freightliner yard always has movements, and can yield quite a few class 66 and 70.  Being near the port of Felixstowe, predominantly it is intermodal traffic which passes through, although other traffic is also seen occasionally.

The depot is often quite busy with movements, and some maintenance can be seen at the rear of the yard on some days (see photo below of a Class 70 getting an engine check-up).  Shunting of fuel wagons has been seen by me too.  For the videography of slow moving locomotives up close on a regular basis, and at an easy to access location, Ipswich cannot be beaten (unless you know otherwise, please let me know!).

On the passenger front, currently, Abellio Greater Anglia hold the franchise for the majority of passenger traffic through the station.  Class 90’s, 153’s, 170’s and 360’s predominantly feature, the 153’s serving the line through to Felixstowe via Trimley, of which I shall feature in a future blog.

Videos of my time at Ipswich can be found on my YouTube channel, just click the link below.  Thanks for reading, I’ll blog again soon.

Rainham Rail Enthusiast on YouTube

Railway, Railways, Trains

Starting a blog….

Well here we go, a blog about my interest, railways.  Specifically modern UK railways, but anything rail connected could feature here.  Also news about Mistydale could appear.  Mistydale is my model railway, always under construction.  A link to Mistydales Facebook page can be found by clicking the three bar ‘burger’ icon on the top left of this page.

So, what to blog first.  How about a picture of a thameslink branded 377 unit at Rainham(Kent) railway station. Oh unless otherwise stated, when I say ‘Rainham’ I’ll always mean in Kent, unless otherwise stated.

Videos I have taken can be found on my YouTube channel, just search “Rainham Rail Enthusiast” in YouTube.  Thanks for reading, I’ll blog again soon.